US salmon may carry Japanese tapeworm, which can grow to 30 feet long: study

US salmon may carry Japanese tapeworm, which can grow to 30 feet long: study

If you eat raw or undercooked fish, you risk developing an infection from parasites. One of the most gruesome is tapeworm, a species of digestive tract-invading parasites that includes Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense, or the Japanese broad tapeworm. Though this worm was commonly believed to infect only fish in Asia, a study published Wednesday in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s monthly journal Emerging Infectious Diseases says wild salmon caught in Alaska had also been infected by this parasite.

Source: wgntv.com/2017/01/13/us-salmon-may-carry-japanese-tapeworm-which-can-grow-to-30-feet-long-study/

Health Risks of Asphalt Exposure

Asphalt contains many known toxins, so we should be aware of the risks to our health and our environment.

Studies have shown: “Road dust and other erosion fractions originating from slowly wearing-away asphalt roadways are considered one potential source of PAHs in the sediments of urban rivers and bays” and, “Asphalt in rivers and other natural waters may also slowly leach harmful compounds into the water.”

Asphalt paving chemicals that are known to be harmful may include:

  1. benzene (CAS number 71-43-2)
  2. ethylbenzene (CAS number 100-41-4)
  3. n-hexane (CAS number 110-54-3)
  4. hydrochloric acid (CAS number 7647-01-0)
  5. methanol (CAS number 67-56-1)
  6. napthalene (CAS number 91-20-3)
  7. phenanthrene (CAS number 85-01-8)
  8. 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene (CAS number 95-63-6)
  9. toluene (CAS number 108-88-3)
  10. xylene – mixed isomers (CAS number 1330-20-7)

The following chemicals are also found at SIC Code 2951 (Asphalt Paving Mixtures and Blocks) facilities but cannot be properly identified because they do not have CAS numbers:

  • Polycyclic aromatic compounds

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Studies: Health risk from toxic pavement sealant greater than previously believed

Studies: Health risk from toxic pavement sealant greater than previously believed

When you think of pollution, you might picture an industrial center like Camden, N.J., or Jersey City.

Source: investigations.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/02/17/10428845-studies-health-risk-from-toxic-pavement-sealant-greater-than-previously-believed